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OK, so technically Emily Roth (’12) isn’t an EL major. Whatever. She’s a fine writer with a neato internship. (You can sample her creative nonfiction here.) Emily also submitted the photos for this post, including the two self-portraits and the photos with her friend Amy Erickson, who works at Olive Tree and encouraged Emily to apply for this internship.

Whitworth English Blog: So, Emily, tell us about yourself.

Emily Roth: An idea that struck me recently is how an identity changes daily, even hourly. An identity is a story in revision. But I’ll give it a go at telling my revised story. A few weeks ago, I was a student majoring in journalism with a theology minor. Now I’m a graduate looking for the next step in the river. I grew up in Wenatchee, Washington, but I most likely won’t move back there, since I hope to become a book editor with a publishing house. Only God knows if or how I will get there. In the meantime, I will continue part-time with the company that took me as an intern and also keep up my blog on faith, publishing, and Christian theology at reviewedthought.wordpress.com

Whitworth English Blog: Describe your internship. What are your duties?

Emily Roth: Olive Tree Bible Software is an expanding Spokane company with the mission to “inspire people to connect with God and the Bible.” I am the editing intern for the content department, working with the content writers to polish their projects for release as Bible resources. I also am developing my own project, a year-long daily devotional compiled from Christian authors such as Charles Spurgeon, D. L. Moody, and Andrew Murray. The first 30 days recently became available for free download.

WEB: What’s been the biggest surprise about your internship?

ER: Honestly, what a blessing working at Olive Tree has been. When I looked at the internships open in Spokane, I never imagined finding one so perfectly suited to my needs. God knew the best fit for me. I don’t have a car, but with Olive Tree, I work remotely from my computer. My friend, one of the content writers, drives me to the occasional office meetings and free company lunches. I have complete flexibility with my schedule, which helps when homework gets overwhelming. I practice editing, writing, and collaborating with co-workers, and I get paid for my work. I also am studying theology and it so happens that all of my projects have to do with the Bible and Christianity. Not to mention, the other employees and my manager are all welcoming, friendly, and helpful. I don’t believe I could have found a better internship to finish my senior year.

WEB: What advice would you give to students who are seeking internships?

ER: Pray. Ask God to surprise you. The surprise may not be exactly what you want, but it will be exactly what you need. Invite his will. Last fall, I was convinced I wanted to intern somewhere else, but it didn’t work out. I later realized it wouldn’t have fit right even if I had been hired. So I prayed God would give me anything, to point me in the right direction, just so I could graduate on time. He sent a friend to suggest applying at Olive Tree even when they were not looking for an intern. I started work a couple of weeks before spring semester. And it turns out this is exactly where I needed to be.

WEB: You’re a freshly minted Whitworth grad. If I may be so bold to ask, what’s next?

ER: From my experience, graduating college seniors usually make vague plans. When I graduated from high school, I knew exactly where I was going. College was a given. Now there is no given. I will work part-time with Olive Tree at least through the summer. Someday, I would like an internship working more directly with publishing trade books, perhaps as an editorial assistant. I want to eventually be a book editor. That is my practical dream.

I try to not worry about it too much, though. I worried too much about finding an internship, and when I thought I couldn’t possibly find a decent internship before spring semester, God brought me to Olive Tree. God opened the right door before, and he can do it again.