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Reading-vintage

Perhaps you’re thinking: What am I going to do with all that summer? Once again, Dr. Laura Bloxham comes to our rescue. Here’s her reading list:

“ . . . hundreds and hundreds of books lined on shelves, stacked in tottering piles on, or strewn across, the floor, slewed all over the surfaces, including the narrow unmade bed; there seemed to be more of them everywhere he looked, giving him the impression that they were, somehow, proliferating by themselves.”

–Ted Stratton, in Laura Wilson’s A Willing Victim

THE ALL-STAR TEAM

RA Dickey, Wherever I Wind Up (Cy Young award winner’s autobiography of abuse and becoming a Christian + 14 years in the minor leagues)

Geraldine Brooks, Caleb’s Crossing (set in 17thc. Massachusetts; gender, race, religion)

Jhumpa Lahiri, Interpreter of Maladies (Pulitzer Prize winning collection of short stories)

Rebecca  Skloot, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (ethics, race, medicine)

John Grisham, Calico Joe (baseball novel; redemption theme)

Anne Tyler, The Beginner’s Goodbye (death and life)

Louise Penny, The Beautiful Mystery (latest Gamache mystery)

Laura Hillenbrand, Unbroken (I cannot stop rereading this biography of Louis Zamperini)

Laura Wilson, The Innocent Spy (mystery; England; WWII); An Empty Death: A Thriller (post WWII); A Capital Crime (Stratton #3); A Willing Victim (#4)

Helen Simonson, Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand (England; love against clash of culture and tradition)

“I like good strong words that mean something.”

–Louisa May Alcott

OTHER FICTION

Jane Austen, Sanditon (unfinished Austen novel and subject of sequel to The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, online interactive adaptation)

Geraldine Brooks, March (novel about absent father in Little Women; Civil War)

Chad Harbaugh, The Art of Fielding (baseball; college; coming of age; explicit)

Astrid Lindgren, Pippi Longstocking (children’s classic)

Mark Twain, The Prince and the Pauper (another classic)

William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair (and another)

Lewis Carroll, The Annotated Alice (also Through the Looking Glass)

Jim Lynch, Truth Like the Sun (set at 1962 Seattle World’s Fair)

“Open a book this minute and start reading.  Don’t move until you’ve reached page fifty.  Until you’ve buried your thoughts in print.  Cover yourself with words.  Wash yourself away.  Dissolve.”

–Carol Shields

MYSTERIES

Susan Elia MacNeal, Mr. Churchill’s Secretary (Maggie Hope, detective, 1940); Princess Elizabeth’s Spy

Jo Nesbø, The Redbreast (Harry Hole, detective; Norway; neo-Nazis, Nazi story)

Alan Bradley, Speaking from Among the Bones (5th in Flavia de Luce series; 12 year old amateur chemist-detective; 1950)

Mark Schweizer, The Christmas Cantata (hilarious liturgical mystery series); The Treble Wore Trouble

PD James, An Unsuitable Job for a Woman (Cordelia Gray, detective)

Jacqueline Winspear, Elegy for Eddie (Maisie Dobbs, detective)

Sue Grafton, V is for Vengeance (Kinsey Milhone, detective)

Jeffrey Deaver, The Burning Wire (Lincoln Rhyme, detective)

Margaret Maron, The Buzzard Table (Deborah Knott/Sigrid Harald)

JA Jance, Judgment Call (Joanna Brady, detective)

Janet Evanovich, Notorious Nineteen (Stephanie Plum)

Attica Locke, The Cutting Season (Southern mystery; race)

James Patterson and Mark Sullivan, Private Games (2012 Olympic Games in London)

Father Brad Reynolds, S.J., A Ritual Death (Father Mark Townsend, detective; set at La Conner Tulip Festival)

Rennie Airth, River of Darkness (John Madden; England post WWI)

Charles Todd, A Test of Wills (Rutledge #1; WWI)

 

NON-FICTION

Cheryl Strayed, Tiny Beautiful Things: Advice on Love and Life from Dear Sugar (beautiful advice and writing; painful situations; explicit)

John Mullan, What Matters in Jane Austen?

Patrice Hannon, 101 Things You Didn’t Know about Jane Austen

Eric Metaxas, Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy

 

DRAMA

William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice

 

Groovy photo is from here.