INK-STAINED AMAZONS AND CINEMATIC WARRIORS: SUPERWOMEN IN MODERN MYTHOLOGY with Jennifer Stuller

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On Wednesday, November 1st, Whitworth University will be hosting Jennifer K. Stuller who will be giving her lecture entitled, “Ink-stained Amazons and Cinematic Warriors: Superwomen in Modern Mythology.” Her lecture will explore the many ways in which superwomen are more than simply sidekicks or love-interests.

Jennifer Stuller’s multimedia presentation explores how the modern female hero in mythology breaks through the traditional gender standards in media and pop-culture. With comics, television and film, her lecture will discuss female heroes from the 1930’s to present day and wrestle with the implications of women’s representation in media. This skillful and sought-after speaker will call her audience to think deeply about pop-culture, gender images, media and storytelling.

Stuller is a feminist pop-culture historian, a writer, and media-critic. She is the author of Ink-Stained Amazons and Cinematic Warriors: Superwomen in Modern Mythology, and the editor of Fan Phenomena: Buffy the Vampire Slayer. She has been published in BBC News, Bitch Media, and Geek Monthly. Stuller is also a Co-Founder and former Board President of GeekGirlCon.

Come be a part of this valuable learning and discussion!

11.01.2017

7pm

Robinson Teaching Theatre

 

 

 

CHAPBOOK CONTEST.

Chapbook Poster

Whitworth University is holding a writing contest in which students will submit 10-20 pages of original writing in any genre, or combination of genres. These writers will have the opportunity to compete with other Whitworth students, and submissions will be read by our award-winning guest judge, Amy Leach!

Amy Leach is the Author of Things That Are, and as her work has appeared in Best American Essays, Best American Science and Nature WritingA Public Space, Orion, and The Gettysburg Review, among other journals. Leach holds an MFA in creative nonfiction from the University of Iowa and has been recognized with the Whiting Writers’ Award and a Rona Jaffe Foundation Award.

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Submission Guidelines:

Students should submit 10-20 pages of original writing in any genre (or a combination of genres). These entries do not need to be formatted like a chapbook and there are no restrictions on subject matter. Students may enter more than one manuscript if they wish.

Each student entry should include a cover page with their name, manuscript title, phone number, email, and major. The student’s name should not appear anywhere on the manuscript.

The deadline to enter work is 5pm Friday, December 1 at 5pm and entries must be turned into the English front desk.

The first place winner will receive $100, a small print run of their book, and a spot as the featured reader at the annual “Script” reading. The runner up will win $50.

Mark your calendars! Richard Rankin Russel Lecture – 9.19.2017

63938 On September 19th, Whitworth University will be hosting Dr. Richard Rankin Russel to hear his lecture “Who Is My Neighbor?”: Leopold Bloom and the Parable of the Good Samaritan in Joyce’s Ulysses.” Dr. Richard Russel is a Professor of English at Baylor University, an esteemed scholar of modern Irish literature, and a published writer. He is internationally recognized for his books on Northern Irish playwrights and poets, along with books about writers such as Seamus Heaney and Michael Longley.

Dr. Russel even shares a part of his past with Whitworth English Department’s very own Dr. Casey Andrews!

Casey Andrews and Richard Russel first crossed paths in July of 2012. Both Dr. Andrews and Dr. Russel studied and traveled for three weeks in Northern Ireland as part of a travel seminar through the Corrymeela Organization. Whitworth Professor Casey Andrews describes Dr. Russel as being a “highly published scholar;” someone who can and has “had tea with amazing writers.” However, Dr. Russel’s focus on Protestant Theology in James Joyce’s writing is what excites Casey most about Richard Russel’s work.

Please join the Whitworth University English Department in welcoming and honoring this astounding scholar, speaker, and writer. The lecture will take place on September 19, 2017 in the Eric Johnston Science Building, room 233. Mark your calendars!

An Enchanting Interview with Awarded Poet Susanna Childress

By: Emily Church

Before Susanna Childress’ campus reading on April 6th, I accompanied her for lunch in Whitworth’s dining hall and a discussion about her writing. Knowing that Childress was an awarded, successful writer, based on the research I had conducted before my interview like any good interviewer should do, I was nervous as I waited, in anticipation, for Childress’ arrival with Thom Caraway. She has received an AWP Intro Journals Award, the Nation Career Award in Poetry from the National Society of Arts and Letters, a Lilly post-doctoral fellowship, and her first book, Jagged with Love, was awarded the Brittingham Prize in Poetry. She was everything I wanted to someday be and I couldn’t believe I was getting this opportunity to speak with her.

Susanna Childress is a delightful human being. Once our lunch began, discussion flowed smoothly and, for the first time in weeks, I felt at peace. In our short span of thirty minutes, we covered everything from humor in writing, the magic of public readings, and how different forms call to us at different points in our life.

To feel prepared for my interview, I visited Childress’ website in order to get an idea of her style of writing, since I hadn’t encountered it before. I listened to some audio recordings of Childress’ reading some of her poems and was immediately drawn in. I was amazed by her ability to talk about these difficult, dark subjects while making her audience laugh in the process. When I asked her about the inclusion of humor in her poetry, she told me that while she had thought of herself as a humorous person in her personal life, she had never thought of her writing as humorous until after poet Billy Collins picked her first book to be awarded the Brittingham Prize. She said, “he mentioned how humorous it was and appreciated how there was a lot of whit in it, and I was like what?” It is not in the process of writing, but in the experience of reading her work to the public that finding that humor becomes a priority.  She finds that even though she doesn’t try for humor in the beginning, predicting that if she tried to be funny it would “fall very flat,” she thinks it’s a necessary element for her readers. “I do tend to write about darker subject matter and it seems to me that people are willing to go someplace hard if you’ve invited them into something more humorous…they will cry with you if you make them laugh. If you just make them cry, then they’ll recent you. My goal for every reading to make them laugh before I make them cry.”

Amid our talk about making people laugh and creating time to write in her busy life, she mentioned how she was working on a book of essays with a small independent publisher. I was curious about how her inspiration and process for the essays differed from her process of writing poetry. For Childress, the form of the essay was what she needed in her life right now. She stated how “one of the reasons that I moved to prose was that the circumstances of my personal life required of me a different escape. The way that I was processing the grief and the transition was very dramatic, and in some ways traumatic, and I couldn’t step into the chaos of poetry.” She talked with me about how since she doesn’t typically write narrative poetry, her poetry involves making a lot of leaps and the following of your subconscious. While, in hindsight, she thinks that this process could have ended up being a kind of therapy, it was too much to handle at the time. “The length of the sentence gave me something more restful,” she said. “I felt like the things that were happening in my life were all very connected and I couldn’t make those connections in poetry.” She needed space and a different kind of structure. For me, this discussion highlighted something new about the different forms in writing that I had never thought of before. Sometimes, due to the content of your writing, one form, or genre, may seem safer or more useful than another, even if this new form is different from what you’ve done before. I was amazed and I was inspired.

One piece of advice from Susanna Childress that is pertinent to young writers is the idea that in making time for writing, you will then want to write more. She said we, as students, should be rejoicing in the fact that right now writing is part of required assignments that need to be completed. Through juggling working full time and having small children, Childress understands the importance of those hours that she is able to dedicate each week to write. In creating a discipline for yourself, Childress said, “the discipline feeds the desire. By making time, you’ll want to make more time to write. Building that discipline is difficult, but could be worth it.”

So, keep reading. Keep writing. And go ahead and thank your wonderful English professors for assigning all those essays and workshop pieces. Plus, also thank them for convincing Susanna Childress to come visit our campus.

 

Emily Church (’17) is a graduating senior and the current managing editor of the blog. She is majoring in English Writing, as well as Sociology, with a minor in psychology. She enjoys hiking, discovering new writers, attending AWP, editing, and the prospect of working with juveniles after graduation.